Road Trip: New Mexico

Three Rivers Trading Post Gallery

We’ve been on an extended road trip the past few weeks–one of my daughters, her three sons, and my two dogs. Though the dogs didn’t go everywhere we did. They got to stay at The Keep, my sister’s mini-farm, while the rest of us headed west.

We stayed about a week with my other daughter’s family in Arizona then spent two days on the road on our way to spend the July 4th holiday with my son.

These photos were taken at the Three Rivers Trading Post Gallery located on the less-traveled state route that angles from I-10 to I-40. The stopping places along this stretch of US Highway 54 are few and far between. But I would want to stop here even if that wasn’t the case.

This blue door fascinates me. It’s such a vibrant pop of color among the desert tans and browns. Don’t you just want to open it up to see what’s on the other side?

The grandboys check out a cactus and an old-fashioned cart. (Both replicas but still fascinating to three Florida boys.)

The trading post’s covered entrance included this intriguing display. Real cacti, blooming flowers, green trees, and–surprise–a ladder.

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I’m almost as fascinated by the ladder as I am by the blue door.

One room of the trading post is a combination museum/art gallery. Bronze sculptures, artifacts, and paintings fill the room. This framed newspaper article is about artist Cameron Blagg whose “oil paintings and prints of cowboys, mountain men, Indians and wildlife are based on hours of historical research” (“Palette of the Past”).

In the article, Blagg says: “I like a painting that leads you into thought, not just a pretty picture of an elk standing by a lake. People often tell me the longer they have one of my paintings, the more things they keep seeing in it.”

If you ever find yourself in the vicinity, be sure to stop at the Three Rivers Trading Post Gallery.

And if you’re so inclined, send me your photo of the blue door!

Where Treasure Hides

Art theft by the Nazis. The Battle of Dunkirk. Colditz Castle POW camp.

These are just a few of the challenges facing Ian and Alison as they struggle to survive World War II and find their way to each other again.

One reviewer prayed for red lights so she could read the story while waiting for the light to change (not recommended by the way!). Another “ugly-cried” throughout the night while on a camping trip with her family.

What will this award-winning story keep YOU from doing?!

Find out now while the ebook edition is only 99 cents.

#EbookSale #WhereTreasureHides 99 cents What will reading this story keep you from doing?… Click To Tweet

Saying Goodbye to The Keep

The Charm of Country Living

When I moved from a quarter-acre suburban lot in sunny Florida to a farm outside Memphis a few years ago, I traded worn-out flip-flops for boots. With all the farm chores, which at first included tending pigs, rabbits, and chickens, it didn’t take long to wear out the first pair so I headed to my new favorite store–Tractor Supply–for a second.

They may look spiffy in this photo, but it wasn’t long before they were as dusty-dirty as the first ones. So my third pair are heavy-duty black.

I seldom wear them anymore. Two of the pigs were sold and the other two ended up in the freezer. The rabbits and their offspring have gone to a new home. And the chickens–well, let’s just say the foxes and raccoons ate heartily. (The experience was so unnerving I doubt I’ll ever raise a chicken again.)

Years ago, while living in that Florida suburb, I got a strange whim I never expected to come true.

I wanted an alpaca.

In a strange turn of events, God gave me not just one but an entire herd. Yes, my friend, even pipe dreams come true sometime.

During this season of my life, I’ve done things I’ve never done before. Like watch a newborn alpaca take her first steps, surprise a fox that was a little too close for comfort, and shoved one of those huge pigs into a dog crate all by myself.

We won’t talk about the deer leg one of the dogs brought into the house.

But this amazing, enriching, exhausting, incredible roller coaster of a season is coming to an end.

Next week Griff, Rugby, and I will be leaving this place I’ve come to love and returning to the Sunshine State.

Another place I love.

Happy 105th Birthday to Oreos!

Join the Dunk Challenge

The world’s favorite cookie, first sold to a Hoboken grocer on March 6, 1912, was known then as an Oreo Biscuit.

At that time, the recipe called for lard. But after a lengthy (over three years) and expensive conversion, Nabisco earned kosher certification for the cookie in 1997.

A bit more trivia:

  • The Oreo name was trademarked on March 12, 1912.
  • Nabisco’s second Oreo flavor? Lemon! It lasted from 1920-1924.
  • The Oreo Big Stuf proved slightly more popular than lemon Oreos. After a seven-year run, the cookie was discontinued in 1991.

For a short history of the Nabisco company–and how it got its name–see a post I wrote last summer for Midwest Almanac: Nabisco and the Oreo Color Challenge.

The Oreo Dunk Challenge

How does Shaq dunk an Oreo? See the video and all the details on how you can win $2000 and a VIP trip to an Oreo Celebrity Dunk event. The challenge ends on April 30, 2017.

The Oreo Color Challenge

There’s no prize for this one, only good-natured controversy!

“What color is Oreo: black or brown?”

This question appears on the FAQ website page of Mondelez, the company that–105 years later –manufactures the world’s favorite cookie.

Your Turn

I love the Oreo Thins. Which Oreo is your favorite?

Use the China

Treasured Moments

She cried when she unpacked the gravy boat.

My younger daughter Jill wrote an update on Facebook the other day about unpacking the family china. To her, it evokes memories of family holiday dinners.

Especially the gravy boat.

We used it whenever we needed a gravy boat even if we were eating off paper plates.

Those days are gone. But not the treasured memories of shared meals and celebrations.

Jill wrote:

I really miss being a whole family, but I have to say that using this china with my family, Jacob and our girls, it means so much. You never know growing up what will stick with you and will be tear-jerking memories down the way in your life . . . like a gravy boat that can make me cry.”

Sure, I got teary-eyed, too, reading her update.

But it was the comment from someone who also received the family china that had me reaching for the Kleenex:

there were no tears because there were NO memories of using the china.”

This is my plea to parents everywhere.

Give your children the memories they don’t even know they’re tucking away in their hearts.

Use the china.